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Blog > Workforce Matters

STUDY: 79 Percent of Employees Will Look for a New Job after One Bad Day at Work

Nearly three-quarters of employees report being happy at work, yet eight in 10 respondents say they are likely to job search after just one bad day at work, according to a study released today by Addison Group, a professional services and staffing firm.

For its latest report on ‘What Makes Employees Head For The Hills?’ Addison Group surveyed over 1,000 job seekers and found that more than three-fourths of employees report that being passed over for a promotion will prompt them to seek other jobs. Additionally, dissatisfaction with their work environment is the leading factor that causes satisfied employees to look for new opportunities, as reported by 81 percent of respondents.

The report also found that although money is a huge factor in making or breaking an employee’s experience, it’s not all job seekers care about. Though nearly half (47 percent) of employees report being unsatisfied with their current salary/compensation, 44 percent are not pleased with their current employee benefits, and 43 percent are not happy with their career path in general, illuminating additional areas in which employers need to shift their focus in order to attract and retain talent in this competitive job market.

Additional key findings from the report show that employees are well informed on what they should be making in terms of salary. With 58 percent of respondents having done online research about salaries on websites such as Glassdoor, it’s crucial that employers take their employees’ feedback into consideration and ensure they are offering competitive salaries, enticing benefits and guaranteeing meaningful work to retain top talent.

“With the job market being as competitive as it is, those who are currently employed know they can go elsewhere to find something better if they aren't happy with their current situation,” said Tom Moran, CEO of Addison Group. “We all have our good and bad days, but what employers can control is how they are treating and interacting with employees, how much they’re investing in their career progression plans, and how they are choosing to accurately match their salary and benefits packages to mirror what their employees want. With this in mind, employers can improve retention by eliminating the day-to-day frustrations that influence employees to seek other opportunities.”

On the other hand, the report also revealed what job seekers value in their work lives and what influences their loyalty to an employer. The work they do tops their list (55 percent), followed by salary (50 percent) and their direct supervisor (39 percent).

To learn more about the factors that make employees run for the hills, download the full report HERE.